Stolen Land - The Revenant Director Fighting Injustice

By Robbie Foley

The Revenant, which follows the brutal endurance of explorer and fur trapper Hugh Glass after being left for dead by his companions in the American Wilderness, has received huge critical acclaim.

The Revenant

The Revenant

The tundra, river plain and mountain vistas make for a rich aesthetic experience for the audience. The land itself takes on it’s own character. Hostile and yet awe inspiring. It certainly creates a sense of wanderlust. 

 

The icy wilderness - The Revenant was shot using only natural light for authenticity

The icy wilderness - The Revenant was shot using only natural light for authenticity

The film’s documentary, which released a couple of days ago, makes for equally worthy viewing. Perhaps most interestingly it reveals the torrid backstory of the repeated land grabbing and exploitation suffered by the indigenous inhabitants of the land.

Just as the film’s temporal setting, which builds on a sense of the initial hostility and exploitation from frontier inhabitants towards the indigenous groups, the documentary paints a similar picture of greedy encroachment in the 20th century. Oil companies swept in and evicted the tribes residing on the resource rich lands. Pollution and social disruption followed, leaving a deep modern day psychological fissure.  

Both Director Inarritu and Dicaprio, have taken it upon themselves to raise these issues following the production and further afield and deserve praise for their efforts. 

Alistair RedfernComment